Robbins Island

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Robbins Island is a privately owned island off the north-west coast of Tasmania. The island is dominated by a mix of coastal heath and pasture. Robbins Island is one of the windiest places on earth with wind speeds averaging around 36 kilometres an hour.

We’re exploring wind energy generation here, to be called Robbins Island Renewable Energy Park. Stage 1 of our project could generate up to 340 megawatts of energy. Stage 2 is subject to Marinus Link, a second Bass Straight interconnector to mainland Australia. Together the total capacity could be as high as 1,000 megawatts.

We anticipate planning approvals will be granted in mid-2020, construction is planned to start in mid-2021.

Wind turbines

Wind turbine technology has developed a great deal in the past 20 years. It includes advances to transformers, drive trains (gear boxes versus direct drive), blades and monitoring systems. This has improved efficiency and reduced operational and maintenance costs.

Turbines from a range of suppliers are being considered for the Robbins Island site, with generating capacities ranging between 4.5 and 12 megawatts.

Other project infrastructure

Building the renewable energy park and connecting it to the transmission network means we need to build other infrastructure as part of this project.

We’re planning to build a bridge connecting Robbins Island to mainland Tasmania to carry the electrical cables off the island, safely transport staff on and off the island during construction and operations, and to transport some materials and equipment during construction.

We’re also planning to build a wharf to deliver the turbine components for both renewable energy parks. The wharf will also be used to deliver equipment and other materials during construction and operations.

Building the renewable energy park and connecting it to the transmission network will require a transmission line. A new transmission line will extend from Robbins Island to Hampshire via Jim’s Plain.

Bridge connecting Robbins Island to mainland Tasmania

A bridge at the end of Robbins Island Road would connect to the southwest coast of Robbins Island. The bridge will be low in profile, but will rise up at the Robbins Island side of the Passage to allow boats of up to 5 metres in height to pass underneath at high tide.

We've consulted with the local community in Circular Head and various authorities to design the bridge.

We've studied the environmental conditions in Robbins Passage to design a bridge with the least impacts. Our work has included:

  • Bird surveys
  • Hydrodynamic modelling to ensure there would be no negative impact to water and sediment movement
  • Habitat assessment of plants and animals
  • Geotechnical studies

Wharf at north-east of island

A 500-metre piled wharf would be built on the north-east of the island to take deliveries of turbine components and equipment. This would minimise impacts to local community areas and roads.

We've studied the environmental conditions of the area to design a wharf with the least impacts. Our work has included:

  • Marine surveys
  • Shorebird and habitat assessment
  • Hydrodynamic modelling to ensure there would be no negative impact to water and sediment movement
  • Geotechnical studies